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Posts Tagged ‘Peruvian Paso’

If you’ve been in the Peruvian horse breed for a while, odds are you’ve heard these kinds of comments:

“Peruvians can do anything any other breed can do.”

“They’re really not that versatile. They’re here to gait. It’s what they do best.”

A recent discussion on our club Facebook page hit on this very topic. An article on Peruvians and reining appeared in my email inbox, so I posted it to our FB page. There are some excellent comments in there about what different people are doing with their horses and what those activities mean for and about the breed.

I’m not picking a side here, but I think it’s a good discussion to continue as we all work to promote our breed. I know we all want to share and show off our horses, but I think we also need to figure out whose attention we’re trying to catch. If we can define the market we’re trying capture, we can target those folks.

I guess that raises the question of who “we” is, though. Are “we” traditionalists preserving and promoting Peruvian culture? Are “we” fun-loving trail riders who just want to get out and enjoy nature? Are “we” parade/demo folks who love to put on a memorable presentation of this stunning horse? Are “we” competetive types who have something to prove to other breeds?

If “we” are all the above, I’d say that’s a pretty versatile group.

What do you think?

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I hate asking people for money, even when I know it’s for a good cause. I work for a nonprofit that helps military families  in real life, so should be better at drumming up sponsorships for shows.

I know we’re in a recession. I know even in the best of times, horses are an expensive hobby. And that Colorado is a long way from Texas, California, Tennessee, Alabama, Missippi, Louisiana and so many other states that are home to nice horses and the good people who own them. I also know it’s asking a lot for people to support our shows with either sponsorships (from $25 to $1,500) or entries, but I really hope we’ll have good turnout this year. We’ve got two great venues: the National Western Complex for the Denver Queen City Horse Show July 22-24and the State Fair Grounds in Pueblo Aug. 20-22.

Even better, we’ve got a great group of people out here who enjoy hanging out, talking horses and having a good time. And yes, I will be bringing frozen spiked basil lemonade again this year.  I really hope we get some more great folks to join us.

So here I am, plantation hat in hand asking for help. We deeply appreciate whatever you can do to support our efforts to showcase the Peruvian horse and celebrate our friendships. For more information, e-mail me at kerrymcg@aol.com  or Mark Renn at mrenn@gcm-careers.com.

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Wow. I don’t know a damn thing.

That’s a conclusion I came to recently in a riding lesson, and last weekend just drove it home even harder. The more I learn, I realize, the less I know.

We had a fantastic clinic up here taught by Kim Montee Cavataio. She covered all kinds of things — tack, gait, conformation, showmanship — but she opened with strong words encouraging us to always be learning, to always work be better horse people.

She talked about how we need to raise the level of riding in our breed, how we have a lot to learn from reiners, dressage folk and others. She encouraged us to find a good instructor who can improve our equitation, and through that our horses’ performance.

I was on the verge of becoming really frustrated. I grew up with horses. For almost my entire adult life, I’ve been in lessons, to include the last two years with Wonder Pony. We’ve definitely come a very long way. But the way to come seems to stretch on forever.

I guess that’s really the point: There’s always more. I don’t ride and train just for ribbons. Don’t get me wrong — I LOVE to win. Few things in life feel better than being part of a barrida. But I only compete maybe twice a year. That’s just a few days out of a full calendar. Every other day presents all kinds of opportunities to do more, be more.

I think that’s a lesson we should all take to heart.

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I hesitate to make a weather prediction here. We all know how quickly snow storms zero in on us after we make some seemingly benign remark about the glorious sunshine. And yesterday’s winds were brutal. In fact, they blew me right past the barn where I board my horse all the way up to Castle Rock to my friends’ indoor arena at Meadowbrooks Farms.

We had a good time playing with a couple of his mares and his stallion. But today I’ll brave the winds and assuage my guilt with some quality time with my own cayuse, Sican the Wonder Pony. The aforementioned bad weather has contributed to his mildly tubby state. Now that the days are longer and the weather gods are kinder, we’ll be back in shape in no time.

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